Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Home | Support RFF | Join E-mail List | Contact
RFF Logo
Skip navigation links
RESEARCH TOPICS
CENTERS
PUBLICATIONS
NEWS
EVENTS
RESEARCHERS
ABOUT RFF
 

 

 
Join E-mail List
Please provide your e-mail address to receive periodic newsletters and invitations to public events
 
 

Participants

Energy Policy Symposium:
Distributional Aspects of Energy and Climate Policy

Participants

Gary S. Becker won the 1992 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences "for having extended the domain of microeconomic analysis to a wide range of human behavior and interaction, including non-market behavior." He also is the Rose-Marie and Jack R. Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, a Research Associate of the Economics Research Center at the National Opinion Research Center, and an associate member of the Institute of Fiscal and Monetary Policy for the Ministry of Finance in Japan. He is the author of more than 12 books and more than 50 articles.

Becker is a founding member of the National Academy of Education and a fellow in the American Statistical Association, the Econometric Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He also is a member of the American Economic Association, of which he was president in 1987. A long-time faculty member of the University of Chicago, Becker joined the Chicago Booth in 2002.

In 1967, Becker was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, which is given once every two years to the most outstanding American economist under the age of 40; the Seidman Award; and the first social science Award of Merit from the National Institute of Health. He also was awarded the National Medal of Science in 2000 for his work in social policy.

Becker completed his undergraduate work summa cum laude in mathematics at Princeton University. He earned a master's degree and a PhD from the University of Chicago, where he was inspired by Milton Friedman.

Christoph Böhringer is a professor of economic policy at the Carl von Ossietzky University in Oldenburg, Germany. Previously, he was a professor of economics at the University of Heidelberg and head of the Department of Environmental and Resource Economics, Environmental Management at the Centre for European Economic Research in Mannheim.

Böhringer’s research interests focus on the economics of climate policy and other environmental or energy policy issues. He has written extensively on carbon emissions trading. 

Böhringer received his undergraduate degree in economic engineering from Technical University of Karlsruhe. He received his PhD from the University of Stuttgart.

Dallas Burtraw is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future. His research interests include the design of environmental regulation, the costs and benefits of environmental regulation, and the regulation and restructuring of the electricity industry. His featured publications include “Addressing Price Volatility in Climate Change Legislation”, U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Ways and Means, March 2009; and “Preventing Climate Change: Second in a Series of Hearings” also for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Ways and Means, September 2008.

Mark Cohen is Vice President for Research and Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future. He also serves as the Justin Potter Professor of American Competitive Enterprise and Professor of Law at the Owen Graduate School of Management, Vanderbilt University and as Honorary Visiting Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of York (U.K.). Previously, he served as a staff economist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

Cohen is an expert on government enforcement of policy, having published many articles and books on such diverse topics as: the effect of Community Right to Know laws on firm behavior; why firms reduce toxic chemical emissions; cost-benefit analysis of oil spill regulation and enforcement; does it "pay" to be green?, and judicial sentencing of individuals and firms convicted of corporate crimes.

Cohen received his B.S.F.S. in International Economics from Georgetown University, School of Foreign Service. He received his M.A. and PhD in economics from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Carolyn Fischer is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future. Her research focuses on policy mechanisms and modeling tools that cut across environmental issues, including environmental policy design and technological change, international trade and environmental policies, and resource economics. In the areas of climate change and energy policy, she has investigated the implications of different designs for emissions trading programs, particularly with respect to allocation schemes, and has also conducted research on CAFE standards, renewable portfolio standards, and energy efficiency programs. In areas of natural resource management, her research addresses issues of wildlife conservation, invasive species, and biotechnology, with particular emphasis on the opportunities and challenges posed by international trade.

With RFF since 1997, Fischer has taught at Johns Hopkins University and served as a staff economist for the Council of Economic Advisors.

Ian Foster is Director of the Computation Institute, a joint institute of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory. He is also an Argonne senior scientist and distinguished fellow, Chan Soon-Shiong Scholar and the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor of Computer Science.

His research deals with distributed, parallel, and data-intensive computing technologies, and innovative applications of those technologies to scientific problems in such domains as climate change and biomedicine. Methods and software developed under his leadership underpin many large national and international cyberinfrastructures.

Dr. Foster is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the British Computer Society. His awards include the Global Information Infrastructure (GII) Next Generation award, the British Computer Society's Lovelace Medal, R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. He was a co-founder of Univa UD, Inc., a company established to deliver grid and cloud computing solutions.

Foster received a BSc (Hons I) degree from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and a PhD from Imperial College, United Kingdom, both in computer science

Don Fullerton is Gutgsell Professor in the Finance Department, Center for Business and Public Policy, and Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is Managing Editor for the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, and Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research program on Environmental and Energy Economics.

Fullerton received a BA from Cornell in 1974 and a PhD in Economics from U.C. Berkeley in 1978. He taught at Princeton University (1978-84), the University of Virginia (1984-91), Carnegie Mellon University (1991-94) and the University of Texas (1994-2008), before joining the University of Illinois in 2008. From 1985 to 1987, he served in the U.S. Treasury Department as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tax Analysis.

Richard J. Goettle IV is a lecturer of finance and insurance at Northeastern University College of Business Administration. Dr. Goettle has teaching interests in the economics of business strategy, decision making and outcomes; macroeconomic dynamics and policy and microeconomic connections; economics of trade and foreign currency markets; financial analysis and management; financial markets and investments; and applied economic and financial modeling, statistics and econometrics. His research interests include the economics of climate change and climate change policy; development, estimation and application of computable general equilibrium models; general equilibrium market implications of public policy (energy, environment and tax); and technical change, productivity and growth accounting.

He received his BA in mathematics and computer science from Miami University. His MBA in decision sciences and quantitative methods is from Northwestern University. He earned a PhD in economics from the University of Cincinnati.

Garth Heutel is an assistant professor of economics at the University of North Carolina, at Greensboro. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina, he was the Kernan Brothers Environmental Fellow at Harvard University, Center for the Environment. He previously worked as a graduate research fellow at the National Science Foundation and as a university fellow at the University of Texas at Austin.

Heutel focuses primarily on the economics of environmental and natural resources and public economics. He also does research in applied econometrics, labor economics, the economics of education and economics of nonprofit organizations.

Heutel received his BS in physics and philosophy from the University of Michigan and his MS and PhD in economics from the University of Texas.

Mun Ho is a senior economist at Dale Jorgenson Associates. He is also a visiting scholar at Resources for the Future and a visiting scholar at Harvard University, Institute for Quantitative Social Sciences.  Previously he was a fellow for the Program on Technology and Economic Policy, Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and an assistant professor of Economics at SUNY at Buffalo.

Ho’s research interests focus on public and environmental economics and economic growth and technological change. Ho has written extensively and has published several articles regarding energy and climate change issues in China. 

Ho received his AB in mathematics from Northwestern University and his PhD in economics from Harvard University.

Charles O. Holliday, Jr. is a former Chairman, a former Chief Executive Officer and former director of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (DuPont). He is the Chairman of both the U.S. Council on Competitiveness and the Business Roundtable's Task Force for Environment, Technology and Economy. Holliday is also a founding member of the International Business Council.

Holliday has previously served as Chairman of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Chairman of The Business Council and Chairman of the Society of Chemical Industry – American Section.

Holliday graduated from the University of Tennessee in 1970 with a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering. He received honorary doctorates from Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, New York and from Washington College, Chestertown, Maryland.

Dale W. Jorgenson is the Samuel W. Morris University Professor at Harvard University. He has conducted groundbreaking research on information technology and economic growth, energy and the environment, tax policy and investment behavior, and applied econometrics. His most recent book, Information Technology and the American Growth Resurgence, represents a major effort to quantify the impact of information technology on the U.S. economy.

Jorgenson served as President of the American Economic Association in 2000 and was named a Distinguished Fellow of the Association in 2001. He was a Founding Member of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of the National Research Council in 1991 and served as Chairman of the Board from 1998 to 2006. He also served as Chairman of Section 54, Economic Sciences, of the National Academy of Sciences from 2000 to 2003 and was President of the Econometric Society in 1987.

Jorgenson received the prestigious John Bates Clark Medal of the American Economic Association in 1971. This Medal is awarded every two years to an economist under forty for excellence in economic research.

Jorgenson received a BA in economics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and a PhD in economics from Harvard. After teaching at the University of California, Berkeley, he joined the Harvard faculty in 1969 and was appointed the Frederic Eaton Abbe Professor of Economics in 1980. He served as Chairman of the Department of Economics from 1994 to 1997.

Kenneth L. Judd is the Paul H. Bauer Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is an expert in the economics of taxation, imperfect competition, and mathematical economics. His current research focuses on tax policy and antitrust issues, as well as developing computational methods for economic modeling.

He is currently a coeditor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and an associate editor of Computational Economics. He has published articles in several academic journals including Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, and Journal of Economic Theory.

Judd has contributed chapters to collected volumes including "The Impact of Tax Reform in Modern Dynamic Economies" in Transition Costs of Fundamental Tax Reform. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and served as a member of the Economics Panel of the National Science Foundation (1986–88).

Before joining the Hoover Institution as a senior fellow in 1988, Judd was a visiting professor of business economics at the University of Chicago. From 1986 to 1987 he was a national fellow at the Hoover Institution.

He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Wisconsin with undergraduate degrees in mathematics and computer sciences. Judd received an MA’s from the University of Wisconsin in mathematics and economics. He was awarded a PhD in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Charles Kolstad is a professor of Environmental Economics at the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Kolstad is an internationally known economist who once served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana and has taught at universities in the U.S, Russia, and Belgium.

He is interested in the role information plays in environmental decision-making and regulation, and does much of his applied work in the area of climate change and energy markets. His past energy-related projects have included research into the effect of air pollution regulation on the coal and electricity markets. He heads the National Science Foundation—funded Economics and Environmental Science PhD program at UCSB, and is a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a member of the Academy of National Sciences committee charged with evaluating the U.S. Climate Change Research Program. He is a former president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, co-editor of the journal Review of Environmental Economics & Policy, and has written more than one hundred publications.

Kolstad received his BS in mathematics from Bates College and his MA in mathematics from the University of Rochester. His PhD is in Engineering Economic Systems from Stanford University.

Gilbert E. Metcalf is a professor of economics at Tufts University and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Metcalf's primary research area is applied public finance with particular interests in taxation, energy, and environmental economics. His current research focuses on policy evaluation and design in the area of energy and climate change. He has published papers in numerous academic journals, has edited two books, and has contributed chapters to several books on tax policy.

He is also a research associate at the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at MIT. Metcalf has taught at Princeton University and the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and been a visiting scholar at MIT.

Metcalf has served as a consultant to numerous organizations including, among others, the U.S. Department of the Treasury, the U.S. Department of Energy, and Argonne National Laboratory. He recently served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Health, Environmental, and Other External Costs and Benefits of Energy Production and Consumption. In addition he serves or has served on the editorial boards of The Journal of Economic Perspectives, The American Economic Review, and the Berkeley Electronic Journals in Economic Analysis and Policy.

Metcalf received a BA in mathematics from Amherst College, an MS in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and a PhD in economics from Harvard University.

Elisabeth Moyer is an assistant professor of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. Previously, she was at Harvard University, first as a postdoctoral scholar and then as a research associate and lead scientist for the ICOS Isotope Instrument Lab. Moyer was also a research assistant at the California Institute of Technology.

Moyer’s research focuses on the processes that control the distribution of water vapor and formation of cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, and especially in use of a new tracer of convection and condensation, the isotopic composition of that water: the tiny, naturally occurring amounts of HDO and H218O relative to ordinary H2O. Much of Moyer’s research efforts involve developing new instrumentation for in-situ measurement in the dry, remote atmospheric regions, either from aircraft, balloons, or for use in controlled simulation chambers.

Moyer received an AB in anthropology and a BS in physics from Stanford University. She received her PhD in planetary science from the California Institute of Technology.

Todd Munson is Computational Scientist in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Labs.  His primary research focus is algorithms and applications of optimization and complementarity. Most recently, he has been working on utilizing constrained nonlinear optimization techniques to compute mountain passes, critical points where the Hessian has exactly one negative eigen value. He also has been working with on an application of optimization to the r-refinement problem, a large nonlinear, nonconvex optimization problem that can cause grief for many general-purpose methods.

He is a member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, the Mathematical Programming Society as well as the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

Munson received in BS in computer science from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. His MS is in computer science is from the University of Wisconsin at Madison as is his PhD.

Kevin M. Murphy is the first professor at a business school to be chosen as a MacArthur Fellow. In addition to his position at the University of Chicago, Murphy works as a faculty research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research. He primarily studies the empirical analysis of inequality, unemployment, and relative wages as well as the economics of growth and development and the economic value of improvements in health and longevity.

In 2007, Murphy and fellow Chicago Booth faculty member Robert Topel won the Kenneth J. Arrow Award for the best research paper in health economics for "The Value of Health and Longevity," published in the Journal of Political Economy. The award is given annually by the International Health Economics Association.

A fellow of the Econometric Society and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Murphy was a John Bates Clark Medalist in 1997. He has received fellowships from the Earhart Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, and the Friedman Fund.

Murphy is also the author of two books and several academic articles. His writing also has been published in numerous mainstream publications including the Boston Globe, the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, and two Wall Street Journal articles coauthored by Nobel laureate Gary Becker.

He earned his PhD in 1986 from the University of Chicago after graduating from the University of California at Los Angeles with a bachelor's degree in economics in 1981. He joined the Chicago Booth faculty in 1984.

Richard Newell is an administrator at the Energy Information Agency. Dr. Newell is on leave from his position as the Gendell Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment. Previously he served as the Senior Economist for energy and environment on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He also spent many years as a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF), an independent, non-partisan environmental and resource economics research institution in Washington, DC. He has published widely on the economics of markets and policies for energy, the environment, and related technologies, particularly alternatives for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving other energy and environmental goals.

Prior to his confirmation, Dr. Newell was a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a University Fellow of RFF, and on several boards including the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, the journal Energy Economics, the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, and the Automotive X-Prize. He has served on several National Academy of Science expert committees related to energy, environment, and innovation.

Dr. Newell holds a PhD from Harvard University in environmental and resource economics. He also holds a Master in Public Affairs (M.P.A.) from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and a BS in materials engineering and a BA in philosophy from Rutgers University.

Sergey Paltsev is a principal research scientist in economics, joint program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  In this position he works on the economics and policy of climate change, with particular responsibility for sustenance, development, and policy application of the MIT Emission Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. Previously he was a consultant for the World Bank and an instructor in the Department of Economics at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Paltsev’s research focuses on many issues related to climate change, including the uncertainty regarding greenhouse emissions, climate change legislation, the biofuels market, the cost of climate change. His research is international in scope, having written about the United States, Japan, Russia and the Kyrgyz Republic.

Paltsev received his undergraduate degree from Belaruisan State University in Minsk.  He received his MA and PhD in economics from the University of Colorado, Boulder.  He has also received an Advanced Diploma from The Economics Institute in Boulder.

Ian Parry, a senior fellow at Resources for the Future where he focuses primarily on environmental, transportation, tax and public health policies. His recent work has analyzed gasoline taxes, fuel economy standards, transit subsidies, alcohol taxes, policies to reduce traffic congestion and accidents, environmental tax shifts, the role of technology policy in environmental protection, the incidence of pollution control policies, and the interactions between regulatory policies and the broader tax system. In 2007, Parry was selected as the first appointee to the Allen V. Kneese Chair in Environmental Economics. 

Parry received his BA in economics from the University of Sheffield and his MA in economics from the University of Warwick. His PhD in economics was awarded by the University of Chicago.

John Reilly is senior lecturer in applied economics at the Center for Environmental Policy Research at MIT Sloan School of Management. He focuses on understanding the role of human activities as a contributor to global environmental change and the effects of environmental change on society and the economy. A key element of his work is the integration of economic models of the global economy as it represents human activity with models of biophysical systems including the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial vegetation. By understanding the complex interactions of human society with our planet, the goal is to aid in the design of policies that can effectively limit the contribution of human activity to environmental change, to facilitate adaptation to unavoidable change, and to understand the consequences of the deployment of large scale energy systems that will be needed to meet growing energy needs.

Prior to joining MIT in 1998, he spent 12 years with the Economic Research Service of USDA, most recently as the Acting Director and Deputy Director for Research of the Resource Economics Division. He has been a scientist with Battelle's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and with the Institute for Energy Analysis, Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

He received his PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and holds a BS in economics and political science from the University of Wisconsin.

Sebastian Rausch is a postdoctoral associate at the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on environmental economics and public economics. Much of his work focuses on the economics of climate change using computable general equilibrium models. Rausch has developed the USREP (U.S. Regional Energy Policy) model, which is a multi-region multi-sector multi-household dynamic general equilibrium model of the U.S. economy.

Rausch received his MA in economics from the University of Bonn and his PhD in economics from the University of Duisburg-Essen and the Ruhr Graduate School in Economics in Germany

Knut-Einar Rosendahl is a senior research fellow in the Unit for Economic Growth and the Environment at Statistics Norway. His areas of research cover international energy markets, environmental economics and climate analyses. He is a past president of the Norwegian Association for Energy Economics.

Rosendahl received his Cand. Polit. from the Department of Economics at the University of Oslo where he also was awarded his PhD.

Phil Sharp is president of Resources for the Future. His career in public service includes ten terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Indiana, and a lengthy tenure on the faculty of the John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Institute of Politics at Harvard University. He will be serving, effective immediately, on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on America's Climate Choices.

Prior to his service in Congress from 1975 to 1995, Sharp taught political science at Ball State University from 1969 to 1974. Following his decision not to seek an eleventh consecutive term in the House, Sharp joined Harvard's Kennedy School, where he was a Lecturer in Public Policy from 1995 to 2001. He served as Director of Harvard's Institute of Politics from 1995 to 1998 and again from 2004 until August 2005. He also was a Senior Research Fellow in the Environmental and Natural Resources Program from 2001 to 2003.

Sharp was Congressional chair of the National Commission on Energy Policy, a panel established by the Hewlett Foundation and other major foundations to make energy policy recommendations to the federal government. The commission issued its findings in a major report, "Ending the Energy Stalemate: A Bipartisan Strategy to Meet America's Energy Challenges," in December 2004. The report has been widely recognized as a comprehensive roadmap for future energy policy, receiving considerable attention from Congress during the recent debate over the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

During his 20-year congressional tenure, Sharp took key leadership roles in the development of landmark energy legislation. He was a driving force behind the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which led to the restructuring of the wholesale electricity market, promoted renewable energy, established more rigorous energy-efficiency standards, and encouraged expanded use of alternative fuels. He also helped to develop a critical part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, providing for a market-based emissions allowance trading system.

Sharp served on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, where he chaired the Fossil and Synthetic Fuels Subcommittee from 1981 to 1987 and the Energy and Power Subcommittee from 1987 to 1995. He also was a member of the House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, where he served on the Energy and Environment Subcommittee and the Water and Power Resources Subcommittee.

After leaving Congress, Sharp was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards, which issued its report in 2001. He chaired the Secretary of Energy's Electric Systems Reliability Task Force, which issued its report in 1998.

Sharp is co-chair of the Energy Board of the Keystone Center and serves on the Board of Directors of the Duke Energy Corporation and the Energy Foundation. He is also a member of the Cummins Science and Technology Advisory Council and serves on the Advisory Board of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and on the MIT Energy Initiative External Advisory Board. He served on the Board of Directors of the Cinergy Corporation from 1995-2006, on the Board of the Electric Power Research Institute from 2002-2006, and on the National Research Council's Board of Energy and Environmental Systems (BEES) from 2001-2007. In addition, he chaired advisory committees for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology studies on the future of nuclear power and the future of coal.

Before accepting the RFF presidency, Sharp was senior policy advisor to the Washington law firm of Van Ness Feldman, and a senior advisor to the Cambridge economic analysis firm of Lexecon/FTI.

Daniel Slesnick is a professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.  He is also the associate dean for Research and Technology for the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas. Previously he was the Rex G. Baker, Jr. Professor of Political Economy at the University of Texas.

Slesnick has written extensively on consumer behavior, applied welfare economics and various labor issues. He is currently an Advisory Editor of Economic Letters.

Slesknick received his BS in mathematics from the University of Washington and his PhD in economics from Harvard.

Robert H. Topel conducts research on many areas of economics including labor economics, industrial organization and antitrust, business strategy, health economics, national security economics, economic growth, and public policy.

Topel is the author of several books. These include The Welfare State in Transition with Richard Freeman and Birgitta Swedenborg; Labor Market Data and Measurement with John Haltiwanger and Marilyn Manser; and Measuring the Gains from Medical Research: An Economic Approach with Kevin M. Murphy. Topel has written more than 60 articles and monographs in professional journals.

Topel is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, an elected member of the Conference for Research on Income and Wealth, an elected founding member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, and a member of the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity. He has held visiting and research positions at a number of institutions, including the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, the World Bank, the Economics Research Center of the National Opinion Research Center, and the Rand Corporation.

In 2004, he was elected an inaugural Honorary Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists, and the following year he received the Research America Eugene Garfield Prize for Medical and Health Research.

Topel has been at the University of Chicago since 1983, with the exception of an appointment as a professor of economics at UCLA in 1986. He is also a founding partner of Chicago Partners, LLC.

He received a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1974 and a PhD in economics from UCLA in 1980.

Margaret Walls's current research focuses on issues related to urban land use, open space, and transportation. She has analyzed transferable development rights programs for managing land use in urban fringe areas, assessed the value of different types of parks and open space, and evaluated telecommuting in urban areas. In 2010, Walls became the first appointee to the Thomas J. Klutznick Chair at RFF.

Walls received her BS in agricultural economics from the University of Kentucky and her PhD in economics from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

David Weisbach received his BS in mathematics from the University of Michigan and a Certificate for Advanced Studies in Mathematics from Wolfson College, Cambridge. He graduated from Harvard Law School. After law school, Weisbach clerked for Judge Joel M. Flaum of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and worked as an associate in the law firm of Miller & Chevalier. In 1992, Weisbach joined the Department of Treasury where he worked as an attorney-advisor in the Office of the Tax Legislative Counsel and, subsequently, as associate tax legislative counsel. In 1996, he was appointed Associate Professor of Law at Georgetown Law Center and joined the Chicago faculty in 1998. He is primarily interested in issues relating to federal taxation.

Peter J. Wilcoxen is an associate professor of economics and public administration at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. He is also the director of the Maxwell School’s Center for Environmental Policy and Administration, and is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and co-director of the Brookings Climate and Energy Economics Project.

Wilcoxen's principal area of research is the effect of environmental and energy policies on economic growth, international trade, and the performance of individual industries. His work often involves the design, construction and use of large-scale inter-temporal general equilibrium models. He is a coauthor (with Dale W. Jorgenson) of the Jorgenson-Wilcoxen model, a thirty-five-sector econometric general equilibrium model of the U.S. economy that has been used to study a wide range of environmental, energy and tax policies. He is also a coauthor (with Warwick J. McKibbin) of G-Cubed, an eight-region, twelve-sector general equilibrium model of the world economy that has been used to study international trade and environmental policies. He has published more than 50 papers and has co-authored two books: one with Warwick McKibbin on the design of an international policy to control climate change, and one with three coauthors on the design and construction of large scale economic models.

Wilcoxen is currently a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. His past positions include: Associate and Assistant Professor of Economics, the University of Texas at Austin; Visiting Fellow, the Brookings Institution; Visiting Scholar, Harvard University; and Senior Research Fellow, the University of Melbourne in Australia. He was also a Review Editor on the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. His research has been funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation.

He received a BA in physics from the University of Colorado in 1982 and a PhD in economics from Harvard University in 1989.

Roberton Williams is an associate professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future and a visiting associate professor at the Department of Agricultural Resource Economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. Previously he was a visiting research scholar at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and the Andrew W. Mellon Fellow, Economics Studies at the Brookings Institution.

William’s research focuses on public economics, environmental economics and microeconomic theory. Much of his work focuses on the interaction of tax issues with a broad range of environmental issues, including health, gasoline consumption and pollution.

Williams received his AB in economics from Harvard College and his PhD in economics from Stanford University.

RFF Home | RFF Press: An Imprint of Routledge Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Copyright Notice
1616 P St. NW, Washington, DC 20036 · 202.328.5000 Feedback | Contact Us