Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Home | Support RFF | Join E-mail List | Contact
RFF Logo
Skip navigation links
RESEARCH TOPICS
CENTERS
PUBLICATIONS
NEWS
EVENTS
RESEARCHERS
ABOUT RFF
 

 

 
Join E-mail List
Please provide your e-mail address to receive periodic newsletters and invitations to public events
 
 
RESEARCHER SPOTLIGHT
Maureen L. Cropper
Cropper describes her research on the public health impact of poor air quality.
Watch this video
Related Subtopics: Vehicle Pollution

Getting Cars Off the Road: The Cost-Effectiveness of an Episodic Pollution Control Program
RFF Feature
June 1, 2010

Getting Cars Off the Road: The Cost-Effectiveness of an Episodic Pollution Control Program

In the United States, 322 of the 675 counties that monitor ozone are currently in violation of the ground-level ozone standard. Nonattainment poses a serious public health problem because ozone has significant adverse effects on the respiratory system.

In “Getting Cars Off the Road: The Cost-Effectiveness of an Episodic Pollution Control Program,” authors Maureen L. Cropper, Yi Jiang, Anna Alberini, and Patrick Baur examine the cost and feasibility of a program requiring permits to drive on high-ozone days.  They find that this program is likely cheaper than programs to control ozone precursors year round.

Ozone is formed when oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) react in the atmosphere. High temperature and sunlight facilitate the process. As a result, peak ozone levels typically occur on hot, sunny days from May to September. Using the Washington Metropolitan Area as a model, the authors examine the feasibility and cost of issuing permits to drive on high-ozone days as a means of reducing NOx and VOCs.

The study suggests that a permit price of $75 per season would remove 34-44 percent of cars and light-duty trucks from the roads on high-ozone days, depending on compliance levels. Such a program would cost approximately $9 million per year, reducing VOCs by 38.6 tons each high-ozone day. To compare, EPA’s 2008 regulatory impact analysis of the ozone standard capped the cost of reducing VOCs at $5000 per ton.  This is equivalent to $70 million per year to reduce 38.6 tons of the pollutant year-round.

The study also finds that the episodic program is not regressive and could be progressive to the extent that poorer residents without cars will benefit from air-quality improvements while bearing no costs.

RFF Home | RFF Press: An Imprint of Routledge Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Copyright Notice
1616 P St. NW, Washington, DC 20036 · 202.328.5000 Feedback | Contact Us