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NewApproachesonEnergyandtheEnvironment
New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 1 Taking the Lead on Climate Change - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 23 Bureau of Environmental Statistics - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 24 Treading Carefully With Environmental Information - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 22 Combatting Ignorance About US Water Quality - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 7 Making Electricity Markets Competitive - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 3 Carbon Tax to Reduce the Deficit - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 8 Cleaning Up Power Plant Emissions - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 25 Better Evaluation of Life Saving Environmental Regulations - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 4 Slaking Our Thirst for Oil - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 5 Stimulating Renewable Energy - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 6 Rewarding Automakers for Fuel Economy - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 4 Pay As You Drive Car Insurance - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 10 State Innovation for Environmental Improvements- New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
11 Pay as You Slow: Road Pricing to Reduce Traffic Congestion
Chapter 21 Zoning the Oceans - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
18 Streamlining Forest Service Planning
13 A New Approach to Air Quality Management
Chapter 16 Modernizing the Food Safety System - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 15 A Broader View of Brownfield Revitalization - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 2 Stimulating Technology to Slow Climate Change - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 12 Focus on Particulates More Than Smog- New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 13 New Approach to Air Quality Management - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 14 Redirecting Superfund Dollars - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 17 Performance Standards for Food Safety - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 19 Smarter Budgeting for Space Missions - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Chapter 20 Taking the Lead on Climate Change - New Approaches on Energy and the Environment
Siren Song
True Warnings False Alarms
Common Waters Diverging Streams
Choosing Environmental Policy
Battling Resistance to Antibiotics and Pesticides
Painting the White House Green
Northern Landscapes
Archive Painting-the-White-House-Green
The Bioengineered Forest
Collaborative Environmental Management
The Equitable Forest
Superfund's Future
Environmental Protection and the Social Responsibility of Firms
Determining the Economic Value of Water: Concepts and Methods
Toward Safer Food
Scarcity and Growth Revisited
Zoned Out
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Emissions-Trading
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Economics-and-Contemporary-Land-Use-Policy
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Assessments-of-Regional-and-Global-Environmental-Risks
The Forest Ranger: A Study in Administrative Behavior - Herbert Kaufman
Adaptive-Governance-and-Water-Conflict
Arizona Water Policy: Management Innovations in an Urbanizing, Arid Region - RFF Press
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TheUrbanHousehold
Managing_Natural_Wealth
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China's Forests: Global Lessons from Market Reforms
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Reality Check
Negotiated Learning
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Choosing Safety: A Guide to using Probabilistic Risk Assessment and Decision Analysis in Complex, High Consequence Systems
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New Approaches
on Energy and the Environment
Policy Advice for the President
Richard D. Morgenstern and Paul R. Portney, editors

This collection of twenty-five "memos to the President" from economists and policy analysts at Resources for the Future, a Washington DC think tank with a tradition for independent, objective research, offers constructive policy options on critical challenges related to energy, the environment, and natural resources.

Each contributor was asked to address the question: "Based on your research and knowledge, what policy recommendation would you like to make to the next U.S. President?"

Writing in advance of the 2004 election so as to keep their essay free of partisan interpretations, the authors took pains to make their ideas accessible to a busy president as well as a wide range of readers interested in a concise, authoritative overview of the nation's energy and environmental policy choices.

The results are provocative, sometimes controversial, but highly readable essays on topics including climate change, oil dependency, electricity regulation, brownfields revitalization, forest service administration, air and water quality, and environmental health issues such as food safety and the growing threat of antibiotic resistance.

Cover of RFF Press Book New Approaches on Energy and the Environment



Link to RFF Press Storefront

Paperback / $19.95

 

 

 

 

 

 



Policy Briefing / Book Launch
(Return to the Top)

RFF announces the release of New Approaches on Energy and the Environment: Policy Advice for the President at The National Press Club on Wednesday, November 17.

(To view the videos, you need RealPlayer. Get a free RealPlayer at www.real.com.)

Frank E. Loy (Introduction)
Frank Loy, vice-chair of RFF, was Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs, (1998-2001), and president of the German Marshall Fund (1981-1995). He also served as director of the Department of State’s Bureau of Refugee Programs.

Link to videoLink to Video

From 1974-79, he was responsible for bringing the Penn Central Transportation Company and subsidiaries out of bankruptcy, ending as president of the successor company. He was senior vice president for international and regulatory affairs, Pan American World Airways, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs. He is chair or former chair of Environmental Defense, Foundation for a Civil Society, and the League of Conservation Voters. He received his B.A. from UCLA and his LL.B from Harvard Law School.

Paul Portney (Editor's Remarks)
Paul Portney is president and senior fellow at Resources for the Future. He formerly was vice president and director of the Center for Risk Management, and director of the Quality of the Environment Division at Resources for the Future.

 

Link to video
Link to Video

He previously was chief economist at the Council on Environmental Quality in the Executive Office of the President (1979-1980); visiting lecturer, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University; and visiting professor, Graduate School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley. He received his B.A. from Alma College and his Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University.

Dick Morgenstern (Editor's Remarks)
A senior fellow at RFF, Richard Morgenstern was previously senior economic counselor to the Undersecretary for Global Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. He also was deputy administrator for Policy, Planning, and Evaluation at the Environmental Protection Agency, and director of EPA’s Office of Policy Analysis.


Link to videoLink to Video

He chaired the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Group of Economic Experts. He received his B.A. from Oberlin College and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

Rep. Jim Cooper (Panelist)
Jim Cooper, a former RFF Board member, is serving his second consecutive term as U.S. Representative for Tennessee’s Fifth District. He previously served in the House from 1982 to 1994. He currently serves on the Armed Services Committee (including the Terrorism and Special Forces Subcommittee), the Budget Committee, and the Government Reform Committee.

 

Link to videoLink to Video

He was managing director of Equitable Securities and founder of Brentwood Capital Advisors, and adjunct professor at Vanderbilt University’s Owen School of Management from 1995-2002. He received his B.A. from the University of North Carolina, his M.A. from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Jim Maddy (Panelist)
An RFF Board member, Jim Maddy is president of the National Park Foundation and former president of the League of Conservation Voters.He formerly was president of the American Political Network and executive director of the Western Governors’ Association, and is a trustee of the Center for Clean Air Policy. He received his M.A. in economics from West Virginia University.


Link to videoLink to Video

Gregg Easterbrook (Panelist)
A visiting scholar at the Brookings Institution, Gregg Easterbrook is a well-known journalist and author on a variety of environmental policy issues, including global warming, quality-of-life issues, and science and space policy. He is a senior editor at New Republic and contributing editor to The Atlantic Monthly and Washington Monthly.


Link to video

Link to Video

He is the author of numerous books, among them The Progress Paradox: How Life Gets Better While People Feel Worse (2003); Beside Still Waters (1998); and A Moment on the Earth (1995). He received his B.A. from Colorado College and his master’s in journalism from Northwestern University.



News Release
(Return to the Top)

Resources for the Future Announces Sweeping Energy and Environmental Policy Recommendations for U.S.
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Stan Wellborn, Director of Communications, 202-328-5026

(WASHINGTON, D.C., November 17, 2004) -- In a new and broad-ranging energy and environmental blueprint for the nation, Resources for the Future released today a specific set of detailed policy recommendations for the Bush administration and Congress.

New Approaches on Energy and the Environment: Policy Advice for the President, a just-published collection of 25 analytical prescriptions, encompasses topics ranging from global warming, oil dependency, electricity regulation, brownfields revitalization, and forest management, to environmental health issues, such as water quality, food safety and the growing threat of antibiotic resistance.
"Although many of these issues were not central to the campaigns of 2004, we believe that Americans want actionable solutions to such concerns as energy independence, climate change, air and water quality, and stewardship of land and forest," said Paul Portney, president of RFF and a co-editor of the new book. "The re-election of George Bush signals a prime opportunity to push forward on a range of environmental and energy issues that have languished in gridlock and stalemate."
The 25 chapters in the book are designed as stand-alone "memos to the President," offering constructive policy options for the administration on critical challenges related to energy, the environment, and natural resources. Among the recommendations:
  • Create a comprehensive framework for controlling the release of U.S. greenhouse gas through emissions trading to curb global warming -- even in the absence of an international agreement.
  • As part of a deficit reduction strategy and to address climate change, institute a "carbon tax" on fossil fuels based on their carbon content.
  • "Zone" the oceans, to protect fish stocks and coral reefs, ensuring the continued bounty of oceans and marine resources.
  • Support enactment of a national Renewable Portfolio Standard, to step up the role of renewable energy and lay the groundwork for an even more potent "Green Power" sector in coming decades.
  • Focus air pollution management on accelerating new standards to curb the concentration of fine particulates in the air, which are associated with premature deaths and hospitalizations.
  • Incorporate new technologies to implement pay-as-you-drive auto insurance that will encourage motorists to drive less, thus easing congestion, reducing traffic deaths, saving fuel, and curbing smog and other pollutants.
  • Tackle the growing threats of foodborne illnesses and antibiotic-resistant germs.
  • Severely proscribe the release of major pollutants from electric power plants.
  • Establish a Bureau of Environmental Statistics, tasked with providing complete information on the state of the environment to the government, creating better understanding trends and issues, and enabling the design of effective, efficient policies.
  • Re-evaluate the allocation of Superfund dollars to ensure maximum resources for on-the-ground cleanups, and re-orient investments in brownfields redevelopment to improve distressed urban neighborhoods.
All of the book's policy prescriptions are those of the individual authors and do not constitute official positions of RFF, which does not take institutional stances on any legislative or regulatory matter.
In an era when environmental and energy policymaking is characterized by sometimes strident and polarized positions, New Approaches on Energy and the Environment presents ideas couched in language that seeks to be independent of partisanship, said Dick Morgenstern, co-editor of the volume. "The fact is, Americans want cleaner air and water and healthy and attractive surroundings, but they also want inexpensive fuel, comfortable cars and houses, and continued economic growth," Morgenstern noted. "This collection of policy advice is intended to refocus public attention on how we can achieve those goals."
RFF asked its scholars to choose policy subjects for the book based on their areas of expertise. Each contributor to New Approaches on Energy and the Environment addressed the question: "Based on your own research and knowledge, what policy recommendation would you like to make to the next U.S. president?" Writing in advance of the 2004 election to keep their essays free of partisan interpretation, authors were asked not to confine their suggestions to what prevailing wisdom says is politically possible. They also took pains to make their ideas accessible to a busy president --as well as a wide range of readers interested in a concise and authoritative overview of energy and environmental policy choices.
"As our colleagues point out in their recommendations, President Bush will confront competing perspectives about the priorities and approaches that should apply to energy and environmental policy," Portney says. In the aftermath of the 2004 campaigns, New Approaches on Energy and the Environment seeks to provide thought-provoking, common-sense contributions -- and needed course corrections -- to the key energy and environmental issues confronting the U.S. today.
"As a country and as a government, we have learned a lot during the last several decades about what works well in environmental management and what doesn't," Portney and Morgenstern observe in the book's introduction. Given the extremes to which environmental politics has moved, they note, the task of achieving consensus often proves impossible.
Moreover, they note, many environmental practices are obsolete because circumstances have changed or new technologies are available, and old laws that were once satisfactory now fall short. "And all too often," they write, "the perfect is allowed to become the enemy of the good when crafting legislation or regulations."

# # #

Resources for the Future, an independent and nonpartisan Washington, D.C., think-tank, seeks to improve environmental and natural resource policymaking worldwide through objective social science research of the highest caliber.



Book Overview
(Return to the Top)

Written by economists and policy analysts at Resources for the Future, a Washington, DC, think tank with a tradition for independent, objective research, this collection of twenty-five "memos to the President" offers constructive policy options for the elected administration on critical challenges related to energy, the environment, and natural resources.

Each contributor to New Approaches on Energy and the Environment was asked to address the question: "Based on your research and knowledge, what policy recommendation would you like to make to the next U.S. president?" Writing in advance of the 2004 election so as to keep their essays free of partisan interpretations, the authors were asked not to confine their suggestions to what the prevailing wisdom says is politically possible. They also took pains to make their ideas accessible to a busy president as well as a wide range of readers interested in a concise and authoritative overview of the nation?s energy and environmental policy choices. The results are provocative, sometimes controversial, but highly readable essays on topics including climate change, oil dependency, electricity regulation, brownfields revitalization, forest service administration, air and water quality, and environmental health issues such as food safety and the growing threat of antibiotic resistance.

When the President takes office in January, 2005, he will confront competing perspectives about the priorities and approaches that should apply to energy and environmental policy: Americans want cleaner air and water and healthy and attractive surroundings, but they also want inexpensive fuel, comfortable cars and houses, and continued economic growth. New Approaches on Energy and the Environment provides thought-provoking, commonsense contributions to debates about important energy and environmental issues confronting the U.S. today.




Book Reviews
(Return to the Top)

"At a time when America desperately needs to overcome its addiction to oil, Resources for the Future has prepared a valuable compendium of policy alternatives. New Approaches on Energy and the Environment presents an exciting array of options in the clear, concise manner White House decision makers need to make choices that will move the United States towards an energy secure future."

- John D. Podesta, president and chief executive officer of the Center for American Progress, and former chief of staff to President William J. Clinton

"A healthy democracy depends on periodic infusions of fresh, innovative proposals into the marketplace of ideas. There they will be discussed, debated, examined, and ultimately embraced, amended, or discarded. These wide-ranging memos from serious scholars represent useful, much-needed, and timely contributions to this marketplace."

- Roger B. Porter, IBM Professor of Business and Government, Harvard University, and former assistant to President George H. W. Bush for economic and domestic policy



Author Biographies
(Return to the Top)

H. Spencer Banzhaf explores nonmarket valuation of air quality and other public goods and has proposed an approach to incorporating public goods into cost-ofliving indexes, such as the U.S. consumer price index. He also studies the history of economic ideas and institutions, such as inflation and the agencies measuring it.
Chapter 23. Create a Bureau of Environmental Statistics

 

Thomas C. Beierle, a former RFF fellow, has looked closely at stakeholder involvement in environmental decisionmaking and has extensively studied the impact of public participation in environmental policy formulation. He currently is an associate with Ross and Associates Environmental Consulting in Seattle.
Chapter 24. Treading Carefully with Environmental Information

 

James Boyd centers his research on law and regulatory economics, including liability law, water quality regulation, ecological benefit assessment, environmental enforcement, and land use management.
Chapter 22. Combatting Ignorance About U.S. Water Quality

 

Timothy J. Brennan, professor of public policy and economics at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, is a coauthor of Alternating Currents: Electricity Markets and Public Policy and a former senior industrial organization and regulation economist for the Council of Economic Advisers.
Chapter 7. Making Electricity Markets Competitive: How Fast and by Whom?

 

Dallas Burtraw has concentrated his research interests on the restructuring of the electric utility market, the design of environmental regulation, and the costs and benefits to society of such regulation. His recent work focuses on multipollutant policy choices, greenhouse gas emissions, tradable emission permits, and valuation of natural resource improvements.
Chapter 3. A Carbon Tax to Reduce the Deficit
Chapter 8. Cleaning Up Power Plant Emissions

 

Maureen L. Cropper is a lead economist in the Research Department of the World Bank and a professor of economics at the University of Maryland. She is a member of the RFF Board of Directors and former president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
Chapter 25. Better Evaluation of Life-Saving Environmental Regulations

 

Joel Darmstadter studies energy resources and policy, particularly in their relation to economic development. His professional activities have included congressional testimony and participation in National Academy of Sciences studies.
Chapter 4. Slaking Our Thirst for Oil
Chapter 5. Stimulating Renewable Energy: A "Green Power" Initiative

 

Carolyn Fischer concentrates her research on the design of market-based environmental policies, including the costs and benefits of different options for allocating tradable emissions permits. She has explored policies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, improve fuel economy, promote technological advances, and better manage natural resources.
Chapter 6. Rewarding Automakers for Fuel Economy Improvements

 

Robert W. Fri has served as director of the National Museum of Natural History, president of Resources for the Future, and deputy administrator of both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Energy Research and Development Administration.
Chapter 1. Taking the Lead on Climate Change

 

Winston Harrington pursues research interests that encompass urban transportation, motor vehicles and air quality, and problems of estimating the costs of environmental policy. He has written or coauthored five books, including Choosing Environmental Policy: Comparing Instruments and Outcomes in the United States and Europe.
Chapter 9. Pay-As-You-Drive for Car Insurance
Chapter 10. State Innovation for Environmental Improvements: Experimental Federalism

 

Sandra A. Hoffman examines the use of regulation and tort law in managing health and environmental risks, currently focusing on food safety, valuation of children's benefits from environmental protection, and tort compensation for nonmonetary loss. She is a coeditor of Toward Safer Food: Perspectives on Risk and Priority Setting.
Chapter 17. Performance Standards for Food Safety

 

Raymond J. Kopp led the first examination of the cost of major U.S. environmental regulations, using an approach that is now widely accepted as state-of-the-art in cost-benefit analysis. He is the coauthor of Valuing Natural Assets: The Economics of Natural Resource Damage Assessment and is a member of the U.S. Department of State?s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy.
Chapter 2. Stimulating Technology to Slow Climate Change

 

Alan J. Krupnick analyzes the benefits, costs, and design of air pollution policies and also focuses on valuation of health and ecological improvements. He is former senior economist at the Council of Economic Advisers. He is the author of Valuing Health Outcomes: Policy Choices and Technical Issues.
Chapter 12. Focus on Particulates More Than Smog
Chapter 13. A New Approach to Air Quality Management 
Chapter 17. Performance Standards for Food Safety

 

Ramanan Laxminarayan's work on "resistance economics" uses economic analysis to develop policy responses to such problems as bacterial resistance to antibiotics and pest resistance to pesticides. He has served on expert panels on these issues at the World Health Organization and the Institute of Medicine and is editor of Battling Resistance to Antibiotics and Pesticides: An Economic Approach.
Chapter 20. Getting Serious About Antibiotic Resistance

 

Molly K. Macauley devotes her research interests to space policy and the economics of new technologies. She serves on several National Research Council committees addressing space policy and has testified numerous times before Congress on her work.
Chapter 19. Smarter Budgeting for Space Missions

 

Richard D. Morgenstern focuses on the costs, benefits, and design of environmental policies. His research interests include conventional types of pollution as well as global climate change. He has served in senior policy posts in both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of State.
Chapter 2. Stimulating Technology to Slow Climate Change

 

Richard G. Newell concentrates his research and outreach efforts on economic analysis of incentive-based policy and the role of technological change in environmental and natural resource policy. His research applications encompass climate change, energy efficiency, energy technologies, valuation of costs and benefits over time, and fisheries policy.
Chapter 2. Stimulating Technology to Slow Climate Change

 

Karen L. Palmer  explores the environmental and economic consequences of electricity restructuring and studies environmental policies focused on electricity generators. She also researches the economics of recycling and product stewardship. A former visiting economist at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, she is coauthor of Alternating Currents: Electricity Markets and Public Policy.
Chapter 8. Cleaning Up Power Plant Emissions
Chapter 10. State Innovation for Environmental Improvements: Experimental Federalism

 

Ian Parry specializes in environmental, transportation, energy, and tax policies. His recent work has analyzed gasoline taxes, fuel economy standards, mass transit subsidies, alcohol taxes, policies to reduce traffic congestion and accidents, environmental tax shifts, the role of technology policy in environmental protection, and the distributional impacts of pollution control.
Chapter 4. Slaking Our Thirst for Oil
Chapter 9. Pay-As-You-Drive for Car Insurance
Chapter 11. Pay as You Slow: Road Pricing to Reduce Traffic Congestion

 

William A. Pizer centers his work on econometrics and public finance. He applies much of this work to the question of how to design and implement policies to reduce the threat of human-induced climate change. He is a senior economist at the National Commission on Energy Policy and served as senior economist at the Council of Economic Advisers.
Chapter 2. Stimulating Technology to Slow Climate Change

 

Paul R. Portney is president of Resources for the Future and is the author or coauthor of ten books, including Public Policies for Environmental Protection. He is former chief economist at the Council on Environmental Quality.
Introduction
Chapter 3. A Carbon Tax to Reduce the Deficit
Chapter 6. Rewarding Automakers for Fuel Economy Improvements

 

Katherine N. Probst focuses her research on the costs and implementation of the Superfund program. She has also examined the management of long-term risks at sites in the nuclear weapons complex. She is lead author of Superfund's Future: What Will It Cost?
Chapter 14. Redirecting Superfund Dollars

 

Elena Safirova uses economic modeling to examine urban issues, including the impact of land use and transportation interaction on policy effectiveness. She has also studied the effect of telecommuting on urban spatial structure and conducted cost-benefit and distributional analysis of road pricing.
Chapter 11. Pay as You Slow: Road Pricing to Reduce Traffic Congestion

 

James N. Sanchirico conducts economic analysis of fishery policy design, specifically the effects of transferable fishing quotas and marine protected areas. This research is based on ecological-economic models and has received numerous awards. He also works on the dynamics between land use and water quality and biodiversity conservation.
Chapter 21. Zoning the Oceans: Changing the Focus of U.S. Fisheries Management

 

Roger A. Sedjo directs forest economics policy research, including global environmental problems, climate change and biodiversity, public lands, international forest sustainability, timber supply and trade, forest biotechnology, and land use change. He has written or edited 14 books related to forestry and natural resources.
Chapter 18. Streamlining Forest Service Planning

 

Leonard Shabman centers his research on studying market incentives in environmental management, including water supply and quality, flood hazard management, river restoration, fishery management, and public investment analysis. He is former director of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, and a professor of agricultural and applied economics at Virginia Polytechnic University.
Chapter 22. Combatting Ignorance About U.S. Water Quality

 

Jhih-Shyang Shih engages in quantitative analysis of environmental management and resource policy. He models air quality, risk, surface water, and solid waste management, and studies costs of environmental protection, technology adoption, and renewable energy.
Chapter 13. A New Approach to Air Quality Management 

 

Michael R. Taylor analyzes and seeks ways to improve U.S. policies and programs that affect agriculture and food security in Africa, and he works with a consortium of universities to develop analytical and decision tools for risk-based food safety priority setting. Taylor, an attorney, was administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service and deputy commissioner for policy at the Food and Drug Administration.
Chapter 16. Modernizing the Food Safety System

 

Margaret Walls researches solid waste and recycling, urban land use issues, and transportation. Her work on waste and recycling includes analysis of "product stewardship" programs and the cost-effectiveness of alternative policies. In the land use area, she is currently analyzing transferable development rights programs for preserving open space.
Chapter 10. State Innovation for Environmental Improvements: Experimental Federalism

 

Kris Wernstedt explores policy responses to contaminated brownfields properties in the United States, including innovations in site reuse and voluntary cleanup efforts. His most recent work examines the use of environmental insurance at contaminated properties and the relative attractiveness of different incentives to encourage their redevelopment.
Chapter 15. A Broader View of Brownfield Revitalization



Policy Recommendations
(Return to the Top)

All Policy Recommendations in New Approaches on Energy and the Environment are available for complimentary download from each chapter's webpage. (Copyright © 2004 by Resources for the Future.) Use of these chapters is for personal use only. Contents may not to be duplicated or retransmitted by print, electronic, or other means without written permission of the publisher. To purchase a printed copy of the book, click on the button below.

Link to RFF Press Storefront

Paperback / $19.95

Foreword
Robert E. Grady and Frank E. Loy

 

Introduction
Richard D.Morgenstern and Paul R. Portney

Part I. Energy and Climate

Chapter 1. Taking the Lead on Climate Change Link to Video
Robert W. Fri

Chapter 2. Stimulating Technology to Slow Climate Change Link to Video
Raymond J. Kopp, Richard D.Morgenstern, Richard G.Newell, and William A. Pizer

Chapter 3. A Carbon Tax to Reduce the Deficit Link to Video
Dallas Burtraw and Paul R. Portney

Chapter 4. Slaking Our Thirst for Oil Link to Video
Ian Parry and Joel Darmstadter

Chapter 5. Stimulating Renewable Energy: A "Green Power" Initiative Link to Video
Joel Darmstadter

Chapter 6. Rewarding Automakers for Fuel Economy Improvements Link to Video
Carolyn Fischer and Paul R. Portney

Chapter 7. Making Electricity Markets Competitive: How Fast and by Whom?
Timothy J. Brennan

Part II. Environment, Health, and Safety

Chapter 8. Cleaning Up Power Plant Emissions Link to Video
Dallas Burtraw and Karen L. Palmer

Chapter 9. Pay-As-You-Drive for Car Insurance
Winston Harrington and Ian Parry

Chapter 10. State Innovation for Environmental Improvements: Experimental Federalism
Winston Harrington, Karen L. Palmer, and Margaret Walls

Chapter 11. Pay as You Slow: Road Pricing to Reduce Traffic Congestion Link to Video
Ian Parry and Elena Safirova

Chapter 12. Focus on Particulates More Than Smog
Alan J. Krupnick

Chapter 13. A New Approach to Air Quality Management 
Alan J. Krupnick and Jhih-Shyang Shih

Chapter 14. Redirecting Superfund Dollars
Katherine N. Probst

Chapter 15. A Broader View of Brownfield Revitalization
Kris Wernstedt

Chapter 16. Modernizing the Food Safety System Link to Video
Michael R. Taylor

Chapter 17. Performance Standards for Food Safety
Sandra A. Hoffmann and Alan J. Krupnick

Part III. Natural Resources

Chapter 18. Streamlining Forest Service Planning Link to Video
Roger A. Sedjo

Chapter 19. Smarter Budgeting for Space Missions
Molly K.Macauley

Chapter 20. Getting Serious About Antibiotic Resistance Link to Video
Ramanan Laxminarayan

Chapter 21. Zoning the Oceans: Changing the Focus of U.S. Fisheries Management  Link to Video
James N. Sanchirico

Part IV. Information Decision Frameworks

Chapter 22. Combatting Ignorance About U.S. Water Quality Link to Video
James Boyd and Leonard Shabman

Chapter 23. Create a Bureau of Environmental Statistics
H. Spencer Banzhaf

Chapter 24. Treading Carefully with Environmental Information
Thomas C. Beierle

Chapter 25. Better Evaluation of Life-Saving Environmental Regulations Link to Video
Maureen L. Cropper

Index

 

 

Negotiating Environment and Science cover
Negotiating Environment and Science
Richard J. Smith

Sustainable Resources in America cover
Perspectives on Sustainable Resources in America

Roger A. Sedjo

From the Corn Belt to the Gulf cover
From the Corn Belt to the Gulf
Joan Iverson  Nassauer, Mary V. Santelmann, and Donald Scavia

 

 

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