Resources Magazine

Resources magazine is RFF’s flagship publication. Since 1959, it has served as a forum for RFF experts and invited scholars, policymakers, and business leaders to offer insight into today’s most pressing environmental, energy, and natural resource issues.

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Resources 190 cover
Fall 2015

Resources 190

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Welcome: Creating Equity in Environmental Policy

Phil Sharp

Infographic: The Benefits of Preventing Invasive Species: Timing Matters

Rebecca Epanchin-Niell and Andrew Liebhold

Goings On: Highlights from Recent Events at RFF

Commentary: Adaptation: An Essential, but Lagging, Part of Global Warming Policy

Joel Darmstadter

Inside RFF


How Costly Are Driving Restrictions Programs? Evidence from Mexico City

Allen Blackman, Francisco Alpízar, Fredrik Carlsson, Marisol Rivera Planter

A novel approach to calculating the costs of Mexico City’s “Day Without Driving” program estimates that roughly 3 percent of the country’s GDP is spent on the program—and that the costs are disproportionately burdensome for lower-income drivers.

How Do Environmental Policies Affect Employment?

Marc Hafstead, Roberton C. Williams III

A carbon tax is unlikely to reduce the number of jobs in the US economy, contrary to what some critics suggest. Instead, jobs will shift away from polluting industries toward cleaner ones, a transition that can be made smoother by sound policy design.

The Costs of Competing Goals in Fishery Management

Kailin Kroetz, James N. Sanchirico

Market-based permit trading programs can help ensure that fisheries are both sustainable and profitable. Many also use trading restrictions to meet social goals. But this can diminish economic efficiency, a trade-off that policymakers should consider.

The Impacts of a US Carbon Tax across Income Groups and States

Roberton C. Williams III, Dallas Burtraw, Richard D. Morgenstern

A tax on carbon dioxide emissions would generate huge revenues, and how those revenues are used will determine whether the policy leaves households better or worse off.

Designing Rebates to Protect Low-Income Households under a Carbon Tax

Chad Stone

A climate rebate delivered through existing tax and benefit systems can shield low- and moderate-income households from the rising prices of electricity, gasoline, and other energy-intensive goods that would occur under a carbon tax regime.

Thoughts on the Future of Environmental Regulation

J. Clarence (Terry) Davies

The US approach to environmental regulation has evolved in piecemeal fashion, resulting in a fragmented network of agencies that often lack the resources and authority needed to carry out their missions. What would a more integrated approach look like?

New Markets under US Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Standards: Credit Trading

Benjamin Leard, Virginia D. McConnell

Under the new CAFE standards, US automakers can buy and sell emissions and fuel consumption credits for the first time. This added flexibility could lead to significant cost savings, but there are challenges to establishing a well-functioning market.

Resources 189 cover
Spring/Summer 2015

Resources 189

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Welcome: On the Frontiers of Climate Policy

Phil Sharp

Infographic: Pits versus Tanks: Comparing Storage Methods for Fluids Used in Fracking

Goings On: Highlights from Recent Events at RFF

Commentary: Getting Past the “Yuck” Factor: Recycled Water in Florida and Other States

Yusuke Kuwayama and Hannah Kamen

Q & A: A View of the Environmental Policy Landscape from Outside the Beltway

An Interview with Paul Portney

Inside RFF


Should We Price Carbon from Federal Coal?

Alan Krupnick, Nathan Richardson, Joel Darmstadter, and Katrina McLaughlin

About 40 percent of coal production in the United States takes place on federal lands. Since the government is required to consider the environment when determining how this land should be used, it could decide to incorporate a carbon charge in its planning processes or leases.

The Road to Paris and Beyond: Comparing Emissions Mitigation Efforts

Joseph E. Aldy and William A. Pizer

Understanding how countries’ climate change pledges measure up will play a critical role in the negotiating process for a global climate agreement. Three principles can help guide which metrics experts should use for this complex task.

America’s Awakening as an Arctic Nation

David J. Hayes

The time is ripe for the United States to become a global leader in balancing economic development with environmental and cultural preservation in the resource-rich and rapidly changing Arctic.

The Promise of US Arctic Oil and Gas Potential

Carol Lloyd

A recent report by the National Petroleum Council brings together diverse perspectives on drilling in the Alaskan Arctic, exploring the state of technology and research on several key topics, including one at the heart of the issue—the risk of an oil spill in Arctic waters.

Complying with EPA’s Clean Power Plan: Policy Options for States

Karen Palmer and Anthony Paul

Under EPA’s proposed carbon dioxide regulations for power plants, states are faced with the opportunity—and challenge—to craft compliance plans tailored to their needs. They can choose from a number of policy options that are administratively simple, flexible, and cost-effective.

Falling Oil Prices: Implications in the United States

Stephen P.A. Brown

Oil prices have fallen nearly $50 per barrel since June 2014, providing a mild stimulus to the US economy. Yet national energy security may be reduced, and oil-related pollution is expected to rise.

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